What's Happening in Asian Art...

In Search of Asian Art, Day 1

March 12, 2021

Chinese Famille Verte Porcelain Phoenix-Tail Vase, Kangxi period, AD 1662-1722, courtesy of Ralph M. Chait Galleries, Inc.

Galleries you can visit: Asia Week New York 2021

13 New York based galleries and 6 auction houses that are part of Asia Week New York are open by appointment this week.  Here are some suggestions of where to go, day by day. Appointments should be made ahead of your visit.

Starting in midtown, the Spring Exhibition of Chinese Porcelain and Works of Art at Ralph M. Chait Galleries, Inc. at 16 East 52nd Street, 10th Floor concentrates on Chinese art.

Qi Baishi (1864-1957)  Chicks, Ink on paper, courtesy of Heritage Auctions

Most of what is on display nearby at Heritage Auctions at 445 Park Ave near 57th Street, in their Fine and Decorative Asian Art auction is also Chinese.

An exceptional white and russet jade brushpot, Qing Dynasty, Qianlong Period, courtesy of Sotheby's

A bit further away at Sotheby's at 1332 York Avenue at 72nd Street three auctions of Chinese art are on view.  The two-dimensional works in their Modern and Contemporary South Asian art sale are a change of pace.

Asia Week New York Spring 2021 Online Viewing Room

Today is the day! Asia Week New York 2021 goes live at 4pm EST

March 11, 2021

A Rare Gilt Copper and Blue Champlevé Enamel Pandan, Deccan, Aurangabad area, possibly Burhanpur, late 17th century, Gilt copper and blue champlevé enamel, Height 7.5 cm; Diameter 13.5 cm, courtesy of Francesca Galloway

We are excited to present our 12th annual celebration of Asian art in New York. This year the spotlight is on our newly designed Online Viewing Room open from today until March 20. Our 29 participating member galleries and 6 auction houses feature almost 400 works dating from the Neolithic period to the present day.  You can take a virtual visual journey and see a wide array of tantalizing treasures from Japan to China, India, the Himalayas, Indonesia, Korea, the Philippines and even to Iran.

KITAŌJI ROSANJIN (1883-1959), Large Karatsu madara glazed vase, Glazed stoneware, ca. 1955, 17 1/4 x 15 5/8 in, courtesy of Joan B Mirviss LTD

If you are in New York, 13 galleries and the auction house viewings will be open by appointment and welcome you to visit.  Stay tuned for daily suggestions of where to go to see a few of the over 3,000 works of art on offer in association with Asia Week 2021.

Xiang Peiyu (1722-1790 or later), “Landscapes” 1790, Album of six leaves, ink on paper 37.8 x 55.5 cm (14 7/8 x 21 7/8 in.), courtesy of Kaikodo LLC

Please join us later today, at 5pm, to Zoom in together for a sampling of the highlights from our online exhibition and of Asian art currently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Our panelists include: Maxwell K. Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art, Olivia Hamilton, Specialist, Head of Department, in the Chinese Works of Art department at Christie’s New York, Katherine Martin, Chairperson, Asia Week New York and Managing Director, Scholten Japanese Art, and Eric Zetterquist, principal, Zetterquist Galleries, New York.

To reserve, click here: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_oA86NxqZSB273qYA5C2gxw

The Forbidden City at 600:  Women in the Imperial Palace

March 10, 2021

Much is known about the lives of the emperors who lived behind the vermilion walls of the Forbidden City. But what of the women? In the third program of a series commemorating the 600th anniversary of the Forbidden City, Jan Stuart, top China curator at the Smithsonian, and Di Yajing, architecture expert from the Palace Museum, will share objects and spaces used by the women of the imperial court. Following that, Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, will join them in a wide-ranging conversation about life within the walls of the Forbidden City. Wang Xudong, director of the Palace Museum, will open the program with thoughts on conservation of the Forbidden City for the next 600 years.

To register: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_-vbNElB8SoS4r8VU5YYnKg

Revelations: Jayashree Chakravarty in dialogue with Roobina Karode

March 10, 2021

Director and Chief Curator, Kiran Nadar museum of art, New Delhi.
In collaboration with Akar Prakar and Asia Week New York, 2021.
17 March 2021 6:30 PM in India,
(Check EST as clocks change on March 14)

Please click the link below to join the webinar:
https://zoom.us/j/97967215863
Webinar ID: 979 6721 5863

Auction of Asian Works of Art at Doyle

March 9, 2021

A Rare Chinese Longquan Celadon Drum Form Box and Cover, Song-Yuan Dynasty

Auction of Asian Works of Art at Doyle
Monday, March 15, 2021 at 10am

NEW YORK, NY -- Doyle’s Asian Works of Art auction, part of Asia Week New York, will take place on Monday, March 15, 2021 at 10am. Doyle is presenting a curated sale of over 300 lots featuring the arts of China, Japan and elsewhere throughout Asia dating from the Neolithic Period through the 20th century. Showcased will be bronzes, jades, snuff bottles, porcelains, pottery, scholar’s objects and paintings from prominent collections and estates.

A Rare Chinese Longquan Celadon Drum-Form Box and Cover
Southern Song-Yuan Dynasty
Well-potted with rounded, relief-decorated sides with leafy floral scrolling and mask handles above row of pinwheel bosses at base; the cover with row of bosses at side and molded to top with lotus blossom; decorated with thick and pale blue-celadon glaze; the mouth and foot rim burnt orange red with some slight exposure of grey-white stoneware body. Height 4 1/4 inches. Lot 224.
Estimate: $50,000 - $70,000
Provenance:
The Estate of a Connecticut Private Collector

A Fine Chinese Enameled Porcelain Lantern VaseQianlong Seal Mark in Underglaze Blue and of the PeriodThe rounded, cylindrical vase with molded bat-form handles at shoulder and well decorated in famille rose enamels with lotus scrolls, chimes and red bats. Height 10 3/4 inches.  Lot 263.Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000
Provenance:
Acquired from a Private American Collection

A Fine Pair of Chinese Huanghuali High-Back Armchairs 18th Century
Apart from the subtle grace and symmetry of these rare huanghuali chairs, their originality is what should appeal to buyers of classical Chinese furniture. Both chairs display gentle signs of age and use, from the wear to the foot rails to the rounded edges of the arms. The buyer of Lot 87 will also be inheriting a legacy of care that has kept these fine chairs in show condition for over two centuries.
Estimate: $15,000-$20,000

EXHIBITION
Friday, March 12 through Sunday, March 14, Noon-5pm
And by appointment on other days and evenings
Safety protocols will be in place.

Japanese Art Society of America (JASA) Annual Meeting Lecture on Zoom

March 9, 2021

Sunday March 14 at 5:00 EDT
All lectures are Zoom webinars and require advance registration.

Monumental Satsuma Vase featuring Gods of the Sea in a procession with Kiyomizudera bell; Earthenware with wooden stand; Brodey Collection, Chapel Hill, NC

 

Making Meiji Modern
Michelle Yun Mapplethorpe, VP for Global Artistic Programs and Director of the Asia Society Museum in New York, will moderate a conversation with the JASA 50th Anniversary Exhibition's Co-Curators, Dr. Bradley Bailey, Ting Tsung and Wei Fung Chao Curator of Asian Art, Museum of Fine Arts Houston and Professor Chelsea Foxwell, University of Chicago.

Click here to register for the Zoom event: March 14 Zoom Webinar

14th ANNUAL ASIA WEEK Lecture on the Arts of South and Southeast Asia

March 8, 2021

at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
March 12 @ 4.30 p.m. ET

John Guy presents 

Luxury Goods: Ivory and Temple Décor in 18th Century Sri Lanka

Zoom Lecture. Click here to register.

 

Tradition Redefined: Rosanjin and His Rivals at Joan B Mirviss LTD

March 6, 2021

An online discussion on Zoom with Japanese art experts
to open Asia Week New York 2021
Wednesday March 10 at 5pm EST

Kitaōji Rosanjin (1883-1959) has long been hailed as one of the greatest ceramists of the twentieth century. While he forged a remarkable career, it was not without first crossing paths, and even colliding, with many of his contemporaries who were themselves renowned ceramic masters: Arakawa Toyozō, Fujiwara Kei, Kaneshige Tōyō, Katō Tokurō, Kawakita Handeishi, and Koyama Fujio.

Our panel of experts will re-examine the legend of Rosanjin as TRADITION REDEFINED places his oeuvre in dialogue with works by these other mid-century titans. They will discuss how some were indispensable to the advancement of Rosanjin’s outsized reputation, and how most remain relatively unknown in the West today.

PANELISTS:

LOUISE CORT, curator emerita of ceramics, National Museum of Asian Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC

JOAN CUMMINS, Lisa and Bernard Selz Curator of Asian Art at the Brooklyn Museum, New York

MEGHEN JONES, Associate Professor of Art History, School or Art and Design, Alfred University

KURODA KUSAOMI of Shibuya Kurodatoen Co., LTD, the foremost modern ceramics gallery in Japan

Discussion moderated by JOAN MIRVISS

Contact Director@mirviss.com to RSVP. Space is limited. 

On a Newly Designed Digital Platform, Asia Week New York Opens with a Virtual Preview of Major Highlights from Galleries and Auction Houses March 11 at 5:00 p.m. (EST)

March 5, 2021

UTAGAWA HIROSHIGE, Toto ryogoku yusen no zu (View of pleasure boats at Ryogoku, the Eastern capital), triptych, polychrome woodcut, Japan, c.1830 (Courtesy: Hara Shobo)

New York: Asia Week New York is delighted to present a Virtual Preview of ancient and contemporary treasures from the Far East on Thursday, March 11 at 5:00 p.m. (EST); 2:00 p.m. (PST). To reserve, click here:  https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_oA86NxqZSB273qYA5C2gxw

To celebrate this exciting occasion, a panel of distinguished guest speakers will provide a preview of Asian art in their respective fields. They include: Maxwell K. Hearn, Douglas Dillon Chairman of the Department of Asian Art, Olivia Hamilton, Specialist, Head of Department, in the Chinese Works of Art department at Christie’s New York, Katherine Martin, Chairperson, Asia Week New York and Managing Director, Scholten Japanese Art, and Eric Zetterquist, principal, Zetterquist Galleries, New York.

“On behalf of everyone involved with Asia Week New York, I extend my thanks and appreciation for keeping the ball rolling during the past year,” says Katherine Martin. “We are grateful for the devoted group of galleries, auction houses, museums, curators, collectors, scholars, and the public-at-large who have stood behind us and kept us going and are optimistic that Asia Week New York will return in full force next year.”

According to Martin, Asia Week New York has created a highly sophisticated and streamlined digital platform for dealers and auction houses to present a selection of their respective highlights which can be accessed on www.asiaweekny.com, starting March 11th.

About the Panel

Maxwell K.,(Mike) Hearn Douglas Dillon Chairman, Department of Asian Art, began working at the Metropolitan Museum in 1971, helping oversee the expansion of the Met’s collection of Chinese art as well as major additions to its exhibition spaces, including the Astor Chinese Garden Court, the Douglas Dillon Galleries, and the renovated and expanded galleries for Chinese painting and calligraphy. He has worked on over 50 exhibitions and authored or contributed to numerous catalogues including The Great Bronze Age of China (1980), Splendors of Imperial China: Treasures from the National Palace Museum, Taipei (1996), Along the Riverbank: Chinese Paintings from the C. C. Wang Family Collection (1999), How to Read Chinese Paintings (2008) and Ink Art: Past as Present in Contemporary China (2013). Mike, who received his undergraduate degree in art history from Yale University and his Ph.D. from Princeton, has taught graduate and undergraduate seminars on Chinese painting at Yale, Princeton, Columbia, and the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. In 2014 he was elected a Fellow in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Olivia Hamilton joined Christie’s in 2016 and has been in the industry for ten years. She has been instrumental in bringing to auction internationally important sales of Chinese art across a range of materials, including masterpiece Song ceramics, rare jade carvings, and the finest Ming and Qing porcelain.

Ms. Hamilton holds a Postgraduate diploma in Asian Art from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. She received her Bachelor’s degree in Classics at the University of Oxford, following which she studied Mandarin in Beijing. She also spent over three years in the Hong Kong office of an English law firm, qualifying as a lawyer in 2008.

Katherine Martin has been the Managing Director of Scholten Japanese Art in New York since 1999 where she has organized over fifty gallery exhibitions. Prior to consulting privately, Ms. Martin was a specialist in the Japanese Department at Sotheby's New York (1993-1999). While at Sotheby's, Ms. Martin was the primary contact for the sale of the Donna and the Late Arthur Levis Collection of Yoshitoshi Woodblock Prints (Sept. 1997, Mar. 1998), and the New York representative for the London auction of Highly Important Japanese Prints from the Henri Vever Collection in October 1997. Ms. Martin was also the specialist in charge during the series of auctions of inro, netsuke, and works of art from the Collection of the Late Charles A. Greenfield (Sept. 1997, March 1998, Sept. 1998). From 2012 she has served on the Planning Committee of the Asia Week New York Association, Inc. (AWNY), on its Board as Treasurer (2012-2017, and 2019-present), and as Chairperson of AWNY as of March 2019.

Ms. Martin has written several catalogues published by Scholten Japanese Art, including the ongoing series focused on woodblock prints, Highlights of Japanese Printmaking, for which the most recent volume, Part Six – The Baron J. Bachofen von Echt Collection of Golden Age Ukiyo-e, was released in March 2020.

Eric Zetterquist is an artist and Asian antiquities dealer. He opened his eponymous gallery in 1992 after training for ten years with dealer and photographer, Hiroshi Sugimoto. While presenting early ceramics from all of Asia, he has specialized in those from Tang through Yuan Dynasties in China, as well as 11th to 16th centuries in South East Asia and Japan.

Since the inception of his gallery, Zetterquist has mounted over 50 exhibitions and authored 14 exhibition catalogs. He has hosted numerous “handling sessions” for University undergraduate and graduate students, in the belief that ceramics should be handled to be fully understood. In 2015, Zetterquist presented "Ly Dynasty White and Brown-and-White Wares; A Visual Declaration of Independence” at the Cornell University symposium, “Vietnamese Ceramics: Objects at the Crossroads.”

As he embarks on his fourth decade as a gallerist, Eric Zetterquist looks forward to presenting the best of Asian ceramics in New York, while contributing to their understanding and appreciation in the rich tapestry of world art history.

About Asia Week New York

The collaboration of top-tier international Asian art galleries, the five major auction houses, Bonhams, Christie’s, Doyle, Heritage Auctions, iGavel, and Sotheby’s, and numerous museums and Asian cultural institutions, Asia Week New York is a week-long celebration filled with a non-stop schedule of simultaneous gallery open houses, Asian art auctions as well as numerous museum exhibitions, lectures, and special events. Participants from Great Britain, India, Italy, Japan, and the United States unveil an extraordinary array of museum-quality treasures from China, India, the Himalayas, Southeast Asia, Tibet, Nepal, Japan, and Korea.

Asia Week New York Association, Inc. is a 501(c)(6) non-profit trade membership organization registered with the state of New York. For more information visit www.AsiaWeekNewYork.com @asiaweekny #asiaweekny

About Songtsam, Presenting Sponsor

Founded by Baima Duoji, in 2000, the Songtsam Hotels, Resorts, & Tour is the only collection of luxury Tibetan-style retreats found across the Tibetan Plateau that offers guests sophisticated elegance, refined design, modern amenities, and unobtrusive service in places of natural beauty and cultural interest. With his long-standing and strong interest in Chinese, Himalayan, and Southeast Asian art, Mr. Baima started collecting art long before he established his first hotel, Songtsam Lodge Shangri-La, which is located next to the famous Songzanlin Monastery in Shangri-La. Many of the properties across the Tibetan plateau are decorated with Mr. Baima’s personal collection, with each hotel acting as a private art museum. Songtsam aims to share the beauty of humanity’s imagination and creativity with people from all over the world and has been exploring and preserving the essence of Tibetan culture, all the while maintaining a commitment to supporting economic development, local communities, environmental conservation, and sustainability within Tibet and Yunnan. For more information, visit www.songtsam.com/en

Sotheby’s New York Presents: March Asia Week Sale Series, Spanning 4,000 Years of History

March 4, 2021

An Exceptional and Rare Blue and White 'Floral' Bowl, Ming Dynasty, Yongle Period

Sotheby’s is delighted to present highlights of its upcoming Asia Week sales in New York, featuring a diverse array of Asian art spanning 4,000 years of history. Among the highlights are an exceptional selection of Imperial jades and cloisonné enamels from the Brooklyn Museum, sold to support museum collections; Vasudeo S. Gaitonde’s Untitled – which will appear at auction for the first time this March after remaining in the collection of renowned American physicist, Robert Marshak and his wife Ruth for nearly sixty years, and more. All works on offer are open for viewing by appointment in Sotheby’s New York galleries beginning 11 March, with auctions taking place from 12 – 24 March.

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY SOUTH ASIAN ART,  Auction 16 March @ 10:00AM

There is an exceptional offering of works from the storied collections of Ruth and Robert Marshak and design impresario Patwant Singh, as well as masterpieces, such as Akbar Padamsee’s 1956 Landscape, which traveled for a representation at the La Biennale di Venezia, 1956, and a 1961 French landscape by Sayed Haider Raza.  This year’s sale features works by more than 65 artists, with an effort towards expanding the discourse around the diverse corpus of South Asian Art created in the 20th century.

The sale is led by two rare paintings on public view for the first time in decades, including Vasudeo S. Gaitonde’s Untitled, which will appear at auction for the very first time since it was acquired in the 1960s; and Jehangir Sabavala’s Lone Vigil from 1989, which entered a private international collection thirty-two years ago and has not been seen since. The sale features works from other significant private collections, including the Patwant Singh and Romen & Rasil Basu Family Collection, and works from the collection of renowned art critic George Butcher; a selection of sculptures led by an archetypal bronze masterpiece by Meera Mukherjee; as well as a diverse selection of works from the Bengal School of Art by many of the leading artists that defined this iconic genre including Gaganendranath Tagore, Benode Behari Mukherjee, Sunayani Devi and Sailoz Mookherjea.

Acquired directly from the artist in Bombay in the 1960s, Vasudeo S. Gaitonde’s incandescent red canvas Untitled, 1962 will appear at auction for the first time this March, after remaining in the collection of renowned American physicist, Robert Marshak and his wife Ruth for nearly sixty years (estimate $800,000/1,200,000). The early 1960s were a critical moment in both Gaitonde’s career and the development of Color Field painting. The present work represents the artist’s unique experimentation with color, surface, texture, proportion and suspension, a defiant and remarkable intent which became the hallmark of Gaitonde’s celebrated œuvre.

IMPERIAL CLOISONNE & JADE: CHINESE ART FROM THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM, Auction 17 March @ 9:00 AM

Leading Sotheby’s Asia Week sale series this March is a remarkable selection of Imperial jades and cloisonné enamels produced during the Ming and Qing dynasties from the Brooklyn Museum, sold to support museum collections. Two of the most significant gifts made to the Brooklyn Museum during the early years of the twentieth century are the cloisonné enamels collected by Samuel P. Avery, Jr. (1847- 1920), and jades and hardstones acquired by Colonel Robert B. Woodward (1840-1915). The 45 works on offer from the Brooklyn Museum represents the generosity of these two patrons, among others, who together were to shape the understanding of these two materials.

This distinguished group of works is led by a magnificent Qing dynasty, Qianlong period Exceptional White and Russet Jade Brushpot (estimate $1/1.5 million) from the Woodward Collection. Colonel Robert B. Woodward (1840-1915) was a lifelong Brooklyn resident whose generous gift of 218 jade and hardstone carvings was made to the institution in 1914. Produced in increased quantity from the mid-Qianlong period on, jade brushpots were rarer and more valuable than those made from bamboo, wood or porcelain, and tended to be concentrated in the collections of the imperial family and other nobility. Under the Qianlong Emperor’s auspices, the jade brushpot became an important medium for pictorial subjects. Many of these illustrate historical events or stories as memorialized in classical paintings, while others interpret their source material, aiming to capture the spirit of China's rich tradition of landscape painting. The decoration of the present brushpot follows in the tradition of Chinese painting, treating the surface of the material as a horizontal scroll. The motif unfolds in front of the viewer as the brushpot is turned and with each scene a new perspective of the landscape is revealed, making the brushpot an object that can be appreciated from multiple vantage points. Also on offer from the Brooklyn Museum collection is a group of cloisonné enamels from the world-renowned Samuel P. Avery, Jr. Collection, led by an exceptionally rare ‘Bats And Clouds’ cloisonné enamel vase (estimate $300/500,00). The Avery Collection of Chinese Cloisonné Enamels was not only the most important and largest of its type in America, but it remains today one of the most important holdings of Chinese cloisonné worldwide.

IMPORTANT CHINESE ART, Auction 17 March @ 10:00 AM

The day continues with a diverse assemblage of rare and exceptional Chinese works of art from distinguished collections, spanning 4,000 years of Chinese history from the Shang dynasty onwards. The Important Chinese Art auction highlights include two early Ming dynasty blue and white masterworks, led by an exceptional and rare 15th century Chinese Yongle period Blue and White  ‘Floral’ Bowl, which will appear at auction for the first time after it was amazingly discovered at a yard sale near New Haven, Connecticut - where it was purchased for just $35 (estimate $300/500,000). While perusing yard sales in Connecticut last year, the consignor came across the small yet eye-catching bowl. Given his attraction to its striking and intricate design, he purchased the bowl without hesitation for a modest $35 – the asking price. Intrigued by the piece, the buyer brought the bowl to Sotheby’s specialists for evaluation, where it was immediately identified as an exceptionally rare piece. For comparison, only six companion bowls are known, with most held in the most renowned museum collections in the world, including two in the National Palace Museum, Taipei; one in the British Museum; one in the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, and one in the National Museum of Iran, Tehran. This delicate bowl is a quintessential Yongle product made for the court, showing the striking combination of superb material and painting with a slightly exotic design that characterizes imperial porcelain of this period.

On offer from the collection of Stephen Junkunc III, a superb and important parcel-gilt silver 'Lotus And Pomegranate' bowl further highlights the sale (estimate $1/1.5 million). With its exquisite shape, lavish decoration and rich gilding, the present silver bowl stands firmly in the tradition of the best Tang silverwares, yet it is in many ways unique: it is extremely rare in being fully gilded on the outside, for example, rather than only to high-light the designs, as on the inside. Gold and silver are eternal symbols of wealth and luxury and were coveted in every period, but perhaps never more so than at the court and among the elites of the Tang dynasty (618-907).

THE HUNDRED ANTIQUES: FINE & DECORATIVE ASIAN ART, Auction 12 – 24 MARCH

Open for bidding online from 12 – 24 March, The Hundred Antiques: Fine & Decorative Asian Art comprises over 190 Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Indian, and Himalayan works of art and paintings. The sale features Ming and Qing dynasty porcelains, classical furniture, jade, and scholar’s objects, among others. Together, they exemplify the range of artistic expressions, materials, and techniques from Asia’s diverse cultures. Highlights include a large Qing dynasty blue and white Tianqiuping (estimate $15/20,000, pictured left); an ornate hardstone-inlaid Nepalese votive plaque (estimate $5/7,000); a selection of Indian miniature paintings, jade and jadeite carvings from the Estate of Allen O. Battle, PhD; Qing dynasty glass from an important American private collection; a group of early Chinese ceramics from a Boston private collection; and numerous Chinese works of art from the collection of Henry H. Arnhold, sold to benefit the Arnhold Foundation.

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